Kentucky’s eTranscript Helps Streamline College Admissions Process

High school students in the Commonwealth of Kentucky will soon have access to a free online transcript program that will make the application process for college admission easier.

The state has launched Kentucky eTranscript to help streamline the hectic process of gaining college admission, writes Antoinette Konz of The Courier-Journal. The program will allow students to complete their entire application online for college admission, and transcripts may be delivered electronically to any participating college or university. The service will be available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Jefferson County Public Schools is the first district school to make the system available.

Kentucky has selected Parchment to enable the statewide electronic transcript initiative Kentucky eTranscript.

“The statewide adoption of electronic transcripts will streamline the college admissions process, in some cases allowing students to complete the process totally online,” Kentucky Lieutenant Governor Jerry Abramson said. “The eTranscript system will be easy for our students to use, and it will reduce costs and save time for all parties.”

Kentucky eTranscript is available free to high school students, school districts, colleges and universities by a partnership among the Council on Postsecondary Education, the Kentucky Department of Education and the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority.

Tommy Floyd, chief of staff for the Kentucky Department of Education, said that Kentucky eTranscript will be available to students in public and private high schools across the state by the end of the year.

According to Floyd, 25 public and private colleges and universities in Kentucky are participating in the program. In addition, the program includes a number of out-of-state schools such as Xavier University, Vanderbilt University and the University of Southern California.

“Students will also be able to upload documents, such as letters of recommendation to be delivered in a PDF format,” Floyd said. “Once a student’s school goes live with the system, they can submit transcripts to as many participating schools as they like — free of charge — and they can track the entire process online.”

Students will be able to send an unlimited amount of transcripts at no cost for participating colleges and universities. However, Floyd said, students will be responsible for paying any application fees plus a $2 fee for transcripts sent to an institution that does not receive transcripts electronically, or to non-participating colleges and universities.

The Kentucky eTranscript development cost of $100,000 was paid by the Kentucky Department of Education, the Council on Postsecondary Education, and the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority.

Over the next five years, each agency will contribute $33,150 per year for maintenance of Kentucky eTranscript.  The Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority will pay an additional $23,000 to cover the cost for private schools.

Aaron Thompson, senior vice president of academic affairs for the Council on Postsecondary Education, said that Kentucky eTranscript will also be beneficial for colleges and universities. Thompson said that colleges and universities will benefit by having “one transcript format, less mail to process and the potential to directly import transcript data into their student-information systems.”