Four in Ten Colorado HS Graduates Needed Remediation in 2011

According to a report by the Colorado Department of Higher Education, nearly 40% of high school graduates in the state required some kind of remediation in 2011 before they were prepared to tackle college-level work. Although this represents a drop from the 41.1% the year before, it still clearly indicates that high schools in Colorado are not doing an adequate job of preparing their students for career or college.

Lt. Gov. Joe Garcia sounded a similar note in his comments on the report, saying that it is not only a concern from the academic point of view, but also from an economic point of view since remediation costs the state money it shouldn’t need to be spending. Although Garcia noted that when it comes to remediation rates Colorado is about average compared to other states in the country, he acknowledged the fact that the state wasn’t doing enough to reduce the rate – something that’s typically correlated with higher college attendance and graduation numbers.

The state however, has undertaken some initiatives to combat the problem.

These initiatives include concurrent enrollment, in which students take college remedial courses while still in high school, as well as the GEAR UP, a federally-funded program in which middle school students complete remedial classes through a partnership with Adams State University. They then begin to take college courses in their sophomore year of high school.
According to the2012 Remedial Education Report, released at Kearney Middle School in Commerce City, 66 percent of students who enrolled in community colleges and 24 percent of those attending four-year institutions needed some sort of remedial course. Among them, 51 percent required remediation in mathematics, 31 percent in writing and 18 percent in reading.

The report draws on data from students enrolled in Colorado’s public university system covering the years 2010-2011.

The report shows that female students were more likely to require remediation than their male peers at 47% versus 37%.

African-American students had the highest rates of remediation of any other demographic group. Over 90% of those enrolled in two-year institutions like community colleges required some sort of additional help prior to being able to move on to college-level material.

The picture was somewhat better in four-year colleges. Only 56% of African-American students there needed similar assistance.

These initiatives include concurrent enrollment, in which students take college remedial courses while still in high school, as well as the GEAR UP, a federally-funded program in which middle school students complete remedial classes through a partnership with Adams State University. They then begin to take college courses in their sophomore year of high school.
According to the2012 Remedial Education Report, released at Kearney Middle School in Commerce City, 66 percent of students who enrolled in community colleges and 24 percent of those attending four-year institutions needed some sort of remedial course. Among them, 51 percent required remediation in mathematics, 31 percent in writing and 18 percent in reading.