Rick Santorum: Pushing Students into College is ‘Snobbery’

Republican Presidential candidate Rick Santorum wants to see more young people pursuing the careers that they want to, after accusing President Barack Obama and his Administration of “snobbery” for trying to push all students into going to college, writes Danny Yardon at the Wall Street Journal.

Santorum spoke at a forum at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College:

“We are leaving so many children behind,

“They’re not ready to go to [college.] They don’t want to go to college. They don’t need to go to college. I was so outraged that the President of the United States [said] every student should go to college.”

Santorum is strongly pushing his image as a blue-collar Republican.

“Who are you to say that every child in America goes” to college, he said.

“I have seven kids. Maybe they’ll all go to college. But if one of my kids wants to go and be an auto mechanic, good for him! That’s a good-paying job.”

However, Yardon writes that the argument that students should avoid higher education is increasingly rare, pointing out that “much of American manufacturing, which Mr. Santorum hopes to revive, requires advanced studies”.

Santorum gained momentum after the recent Iowa caucus. Despite losing out to front-runner Mitt Romney, it was a close call. A disappointing showing in New Hampshire Tuesday night raises questions about the future of Santorum’s candidacy and whether it will be affected by the path of Newt Gingrich’s own bid.

And it was at Saint Anselm College he suggested he will spend some debate time attacking front-runner Mitt Romney for only being a “manager” when the country needs a leader with vision.

“I don’t think we’ve seen any record of that or any vision in what Gov. Romney is trying to promote himself as.

“He tries to promote himself as a guy who can win. Pyrrhic victories are not victories.”

This comes after a new study by Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce that showed that college graduates with bachelor’s degrees in the arts, humanities and architecture found it much harder to get work, writes Peter Whoriskey at the Washington Post.

Young people with undergraduate degrees in architecture currently have the highest rate of unemployment at 13.9 percent, with the arts (11.1 percent) and the humanities (9.4 percent) close behind, says the study.

“People keep telling kids to study what they love — but some loves are worth more than others,” said Anthony P. Carnevale, one of the study’s authors.

“When people talk about college, there are all these high-minded ideas about it making people better citizens and participating fully in the life of their times. All that’s true, but go talk to the unemployed about that.”