Obama Announces White House Science Fair

Announcing commitments at over $100 million from the government and private sector, President Obama will host the second White House Science Fair to celebrate and encourage more students and teachers to invest themselves into difficult STEM subjects.

The Administration has also set the target of bringing in an additional 100,000 quality teachers in the STEM fields, looking to ensure the effective education of the estimated one million STEM students expected to graduate in the next ten years.

Obama said:

 “When students excel in math and science, they help America compete for the jobs and industries of the future.

“That’s why I’m proud to celebrate outstanding students at the White House Science Fair, and to announce new steps my Administration and its partners are taking to help more young people succeed in these critical subjects.”

The President has long touted his Educate to Innovate campaign to inspire boys and girls to excel in math and science, and now, the second White House Science Fair is set to include over 100 students from over 45 states, representing over 40 different STEM competitions that recognize the talents of America’s next generation of scientists, engineers, inventors and innovators.

The Administration has also boosted the number of student teams given the opportunity to exhibit their projects at the White House this year to 30 — over double that of 2011.

“The President will view exhibits of the student work, ranging from breakthrough research to new inventions, followed by remarks to an audience of students, science educators and business leaders on the importance of STEM education to the country’s economic future,” says a press release.

Alongside the announcement for more financial commitments, the President is also looking to bring another 100,000 quality teachers with skills in math and science to the subjects in the next decade.

As part of the $80 million investment to help prepare effective STEM teachers, the Department of Education will aim to support new STEM teacher preparation programs, such as those that allow students to simultaneously earn both a STEM degree and a teaching certificate, and provide undergraduates with early and intensive experiences in the classroom honing their skills.