College for Every Student Program Helps Low-Income Minorities

The French Consulate-General building in Manhattan hosted an unusual gathering last month. Students, teachers and college representatives – all part of the College for Every Student program – came together for a professional development dinner to discuss strategies and ideas for how to increase college enrollment rates among lower-income and minority youth. The dinner was [...]

The French Consulate-General building in Manhattan hosted an unusual gathering last month. Students, teachers and college representatives – all part of the College for Every Student program – came together for a professional development dinner to discuss strategies and ideas for how to increase college enrollment rates among lower-income and minority youth.

The dinner was hosted by CFES and served as an opportunity for people making up the most active regional cluster of the program to use their experiences and problem-solving abilities to tackle this central issue. Among the 80 attendees were representatives of 35 regional college partners and CFES Scholars from 22 schools in New York’s four boroughs. CFES Scholars are low-income minority students many of whom will be the first in their families to enroll in an institution of higher education. They are representative of a population at higher risk for being underserved and CFES – along with their teachers and advisers – are working to help them “beat the odds.”

CFES’s formula for success is unique – and simple. Every Scholar participates in three core practices that have proved effective in not only getting students on track to college, but also helping them persist once there: mentoring, pathways to college, and leadership through service. Like other CFES events, the meeting at the French Embassy was a chance for educators and students alike to share their successes and explore new ways to put these practices into action.

The success rate of the program is hard to argue with. In the last six years, over 99% of CFES Scholars nationwide graduated high school, and 96% of them went on to college.

Among the CFES initiatives making a real difference in NYC is the Young Gentlemen’s Leadership Club at the Collegiate Institute for Math & Science in the Bronx. The club provides gender-based mentoring opportunities with two male teachers serving as advisers to the members with peer mentorship as well. This is a replica of a similar, successful program already in place at another CFES school in New Jersey .

CFES’s formula for success is unique – and simple. Every Scholar participates in three core practices that have proved effective in not only getting students on track to college, but also helping them persist once there: mentoring, pathways to college, and leadership through service. Like other CFES events, the meeting at the French Embassy was a chance for educators and students alike to share their successes and explore new ways to put these practices into action.

Tuesday

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