Clinton Says She Would Shut Down ‘Below Average’ Schools

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While speaking at an Iowa high school, Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton said that Iowa school districts are “better than average” — but what she said later in her talk has school districts nationwide looking over their shoulders.

“This school district and these schools throughout Iowa are doing a better-than-average job,” Clinton said Tuesday at Keota Junior-Senior High School in Keota, Iowa.

“Now, I wouldn’t keep any school open that wasn’t doing a better-than-average job.” Clinton continued.

If that were true, writes Fred Lucas of The Blaze, over half the school districts in the country would be shut down. And another problem is that the US president does not eliminate school districts because they are locally run. Clinton continued by saying if a district is not doing a good job, it would be counterproductive to impose financial burdens on it.

In an opinion piece written for the Washington Times, Victor Morton said that if Clinton becomes president that would mean that approximately half the country’s schools would be closed. Of the half that remained another half, by mathematical definition, would become “below average.”

It is possible that Clinton does not understand how averages work, writes Chuck Ross of The Daily Caller. He added that Clinton did not, in her talk, say how she would determine which districts are above average and which are below average. He writes that she did not explain if she would continue her removal of sub-par schools for the entire time she was president.

In an August opinion piece, Matthew Lynch discussed Clinton’s position on important education issues. Clinton believes that non-degree workers who receive an education that would prepare them for technical positions should be more respected. She says that relevant training is more important than a degree when companies are hiring.

In 2014, Hillary said she was not a big supporter of online learning for college purposes. She said:

“Technology is a tool, not a teacher.”

Clinton added that she wants to see for-profit colleges subject to a higher degree of accountability. Her example was the practice of taking tuition from at-risk students and then not supporting the learners in a way that would ensure they graduate and find work.

The presidential candidate remains pro-Common Core. She says that education is an important “non-family” entity in the US. She supports charter schools and believes they lead to more opportunities for at-risk US students.

She is against voucher programs but supports school choice. She does not want federal money to be used for private and religious schools.

The former Secretary of State has already been endorsed by the American Federation of Teachers and is outspoken in her support of providing adequate funding and resources for instructors.

Like President Obama, Clinton wants all families to have no-cost access for the education of early learners. She also sees universal pre-K as a way for women to have greater access to jobs.